Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program

Program Guidelines

 

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. Purpose of the Guidelines

These guidelines are a resource to assist District School Boards (DSBs) in delivering and administering the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP).  The guidelines may be amended at the sole discretion of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU, the ministry) and should be regarded as a supplement to existing documents and agreements.

1.2. Program Context

One of the long term priorities of the Ontario government is to anticipate, respond to and meet Ontario’s future trades sector labour needs – particularly through increasing the number of qualified tradespersons.

OYAP helps address this priority by increasing the number of secondary school students exploring careers in skilled trades and setting the groundwork for OYAP participants to successfully pursue careers in the trades. OYAP allows students to gain training in an apprenticeship occupation of potential career interest through a cooperative education program.

2. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

2.1. Overview

OYAP is a program that allows students to explore and consider careers in skilled trades as attractive, viable career options on a similar footing with other postsecondary pathways. The program also allows students to complete secondary school credits to obtain their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).  In addition, participants that complete the workplace-based learning component may be recognized by MTCU as having completed a portion of the on-the-job training requirements of a formal apprenticeship.

2.2. Goals

2.2.1. OYAP Student Enrolments

There are several potential successful outcomes from a student’s participation in the OYAP program which may be that the student:

  • Remains enrolled in secondary school and obtains their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD);
  • Remains in OYAP, but does not register as an apprentice while in the program;
  • Remains in OYAP, and registers as an apprentice while in the program;
  • Completes the OYAP program, obtains their OSSD and later formally registers as an apprentice; or,
  • Goes on to a trade career.

The outcomes that best support the goal of increasing the number of tradespersons to meet future labour market demands are those that lead to students completing apprenticeships and working in the trades.

All of the above are positive results, enhancing the learning and development of students and increasing exposure to and understanding of the trades that potentially leads to productive directions for the student and effective use of provincial resources. 

However, to support the long-term goal of increasing the number of tradespersons in Ontario’s workforce, it will be important that:

  • The student has the necessary skills, knowledge and desire to participate in a trade; and
  • There are opportunities through which apprenticeship can be pursued and there is a positive labour market outlook for that trade.

To make an informed decision regarding OYAP enrolment, trade selection and (potential) registration of a training agreement, it is critical that students and parents have a clear understanding of the potential program and trade demands. Trade Labour Market employment statistics highlighting projected post-apprenticeship demand and identifying “high-demand” trades should be brought explicitly to the notice of OYAP-interested students and their parents or guardians.

Notably, students will make their trade selection based on available employer placements and the student’s own personal preferences, but they should have the opportunity to do so from an informed perspective.

DSBs will ensure such an understanding and opportunity is developed with students and parents or guardians. This should include assisting the student in developing realistic expectations regarding OYAP, opportunities to take Level 1 apprenticeship in-school training and on-the-job training demands.

2.3. Objectives

OYAP supports the development, implementation and expansion of apprenticeship related secondary school initiatives, including transition programs, cooperative education and work experience opportunities. DSBs that receive funding to deliver OYAP must demonstrate how they are using the resources to support these initiatives.

2.4. Program Components

2.4.1. OYAP Partnerships

A key component of the OYAP program is the labour, community and employer partnerships with the DSB.  Employers play a significant role in the implementation of a successful OYAP program by providing placements in apprenticeship occupations. OYAP funding must be used to create or support such partnerships.

2.4.2 OYAP Participants with Registered Training Agreements (RTAs)

OYAP students may have the opportunity to register as apprentices if the criteria set out in the MTCU OYAP Registration Guidelines are met.

Registrations are reviewed on a case by case basis by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) Employment and Training Consultants (ETCs). DSB staff are responsible for recommending appropriate students for registration and for confirming that employers are willing to sponsor students. ETCs are responsible for ensuring that employers are able to meet the obligations of a sponsor for the purpose of an apprenticeship program. For further details, an overview of the registration process can be found on the Employment Ontario Partners’ Gateway (EOPG).

In addition, the Pathways to Apprenticeship: Options for Secondary Students provides further details about OYAP students with RTAs. This document can be found on the Employment Ontario Partners’ Gateway (EOPG).

2.4.3. School-based Component – Secondary School

As noted in Section 2.5 Eligibility and Suitability, OYAP participants must be enrolled as full-time students.

Cooperative education must be delivered in accordance with the requirements outlined in “Cooperative Education and Other Forms of Experiential Learning, 2000”.

The student’s cooperative education personalized placement learning plan (PPLP) must be based on the expectations of the related Ontario curriculum course as well as the on-the-job training requirements outlined in the approved training standards for the trade. Training standards are available on the Ontario College of Trades website.

Cooperative Education OYAP placement supervisors/employers are expected to document a student’s achievement of competencies as outlined in the PPLP and training standards.


2.4.4. Health and Safety Requirements

Health and Safety instruction must be delivered in accordance with section 2.3.1.2 of the “Cooperative Education and Other Forms of Experiential Learning, 2000”.

Students must also receive trade specific health and safety training. All students participating in OYAP, whether registered apprentices or not, are expected to take all applicable health and safety components of the trade’s training standard or schedule of training in their PPLP. The inclusion of these components will ensure that students in OYAP receive the equivalent level of health and safety training as required for all apprentices.

For example, Working at Heights (WAH)– Fundamentals of Fall Protection training is a requirement in section 26(2) of the construction regulations that requires an employer to train a worker who may be working at heights and to have proper fall protection equipment if they are exposed to falling more than 3 metres. Some students, in particular students in OYAP who are also enrolled in the Specialist High Skills Major (SHSM) program, may have received safety training that includes WAH. The employer is still required to provide site- and equipment- specific training based on the particular circumstances where the student will be working. This must be validated on the job site in order to be recognized by the Ministry of Labour. For additional details it is recommended that the DSB contact the Infrastructure Health & Safety Association, or visit the website at www.ihsa.ca for more detailed information on the type of training required for each occupation.

2.4.5. School-based Component – Level 1 Apprenticeship In-School Training

DSBs are encouraged to incorporate apprenticeship Level 1 in-school curriculum, which can be found on the Ontario College of Trades website. Students who complete these courses are eligible to challenge the Level 1 exemption test, where one exists.

Students have several options:

  • Write the exemption test at the end of the term as arranged by the DSB.  Any fees associated with writing the exemption test would be covered through OYAP funds. Fees may range up to $150 per student. 
  • Write the exemption test at a later date; students may schedule an appointment to write the exemption tests. Students are responsible for any costs associated with writing the exam at a later date.
  • Register as an apprentice and re-take the entire level as part of their apprenticeship training.

Exemption tests are available only through community colleges. It is important to verify that an exemption test is available for the specific trade. Please note that if failed, there is a waiting period of three months before the exemption test can be rewritten. Candidates must provide proof (in the form of transcripts or other supporting documentation as appropriate) of upgrading before rewriting an exemption test.

DSBs are encouraged to explore the various Level 1 in-school apprenticeship training options, either through the Ministry of Education’s School College Work Initiative (SCWI) or through MTCU-approved non-college Training Delivery Agents (TDAs).

a) School College Work Initiative and OYAP

  • A close working relationship now exists between OYAP and School College Work Initiative (SCWI) program. It is essential that all DSB OYAP Coordinators become familiar with the SCWI program guidelines.
  • Only a College of Applied Arts and Technology (CAAT) approved as a TDA may offer Level 1 apprenticeship in-school training that is part of SCWI. (Non-college TDAs are not eligible to participate in SCWI programs.)
  • Students in an approved SCWI program are eligible to earn dual credits that count towards their OSSD for successfully completing a Level 1 course. A student will receive one OSSD credit for the successful completion of every 110 hours of in-school class time.
  • SCWI Regional Planning Teams (RPTs) must request seats for OYAP students to attend Level 1 apprenticeship in-school training. See section 5.7 for instructions for the addition of OYAP classes to seat purchase plans.
  • See Pathways to Apprenticeship: Options for Secondary School Students for student eligibility and other details.

b) Non-college MTCU-Approved Training Delivery Agents (TDAs)

  • OYAP apprentices may complete Level 1 apprenticeship in-school training, or a component of it.
  • OYAP participants must have registered training agreements (RTAs) to be eligible. For further details, an overview of the registration process can be found on the Employment Ontario Partners’ Gateway (EOPG).
  • DSBs must request seats for OYAP students to attend Level 1 apprenticeship in-school training. See section 5.7 for instructions for the addition of OYAP classes to seat purchase plans.

2.4.6. Workplace-based Component

  • Students earn cooperative education credits for work experience in an apprenticeship trade or occupation.
  • The student’s cooperative education PPLP must be based on the expectations of the related Ontario curriculum course as well as the on-the-job training requirements outlined in the approved training standards for the trade.
  • Recruitment of students must be consistent with equal opportunity workplace principles.
  • Employers offering training in apprenticeship trades or occupations will participate in the design of the work-based component.
  • Cooperative education OYAP placement supervisors are expected to document a student’s achievement of the competencies outlined in the PPLP and in the approved training standards.

2.5. Eligibility and Suitability

Participants of OYAP are students who are in a cooperative education placement in an apprenticeship trade or occupation. OYAP is an option for all secondary school students who are working towards an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).

To be eligible for the program, students must:

  • Have successfully completed 16 credits;
  • Be at least 16 years of age; and,
  • Be enrolled full-time in a secondary school.

Secondary school students who obtain their OSSD but return to a secondary school full-time for additional credits are also eligible for OYAP. Students may attend secondary schools until the age of 21.

Adult students (over the age of 21) are also eligible for OYAP. To be eligible, adult students must:

  • Have successfully completed 16 credits;
  • Be enrolled full-time in a secondary school; and
  • Be earning credits towards an OSSD, with the goal of obtaining an OSSD.

Students who meet the participant eligibility may have the opportunity to register as an apprentice while in OYAP.

3. PROGRAM DELIVERY

3.1. Roles and Responsibilities

3.1.1. Employment and Training Consultants (ETCs)

ETCs are responsible for ensuring that employers are able to meet the obligations of a sponsor for the purpose of an apprenticeship program.

Both the Ministries and DSBs will undertake joint planning and evaluation of the implementation and delivery of OYAP through a formal annual review process.

3.1.2. District School Boards (DSBs)

DSBs are expected to review the eligibility of prospective participating employers with their local MTCU office to ensure that employers are up-to-date in approved apprenticeship training and that they are prepared to provide a quality work experience and training environment for an OYAP student.

The role of the DSBs includes the following:

  • Provide opportunities for students to participate in cooperative education in an apprenticeship trade or occupation while enrolled in secondary school;
  • Ensure that students participating in OYAP meet eligibility requirements;
  • Ensure that OYAP participants who request training agreements  are the appropriate students for registration;
  • Consult with the local MTCU office regarding apprenticeship registrations, in particular, to review the eligibility of prospective sponsors;
  • Ensure a quality work experience and training for the student as per the Cooperative Education policy document;
  • Consult with labour market partners and employers who can provide placements in apprenticeship trades or occupations;
  • Use OYAP funding to create partnerships or enhance existing partnerships, market the program, and provide student resources and supports;
  • Ensure that the mandatory OYAP Participant Application Form which includes a Notice of Collection and Consent is signed by the OYAP participant or their parent/guardian (see section 5.2);
  • Use the Employment Ontario Information System for Apprenticeship (EOIS-APPR) system for data entry and administration of the program;
  • Complete all reporting requirements within the due dates set out in Schedule “D” of the Agreement (see section 5.4); and,
  • Update Employment Ontario’s “Find a Service” as required (see section 5.6).

3.1.3. Advisory Committee

If feasible, the DSBs should create and chair an Advisory Committee to provide support to the overall administration and delivery of OYAP including, apprenticeship work placements. If not feasible, the DSBs will still be responsible for the activities expected of an Advisory Committee. 

The role of the Advisory Committee may also include the following:

  • Analysis of local labour market information to identify high demand trades;
    • Highlighting high demand trade opportunities for students/parents
  • Recruiting and selecting OYAP students;
  • Developing and recommending strategies to recruit employers;
    • Identifying and recruiting potential high demand trade employer partners
  • Marketing the program (and trades opportunities) to parents and the community;
  • Evaluating program performance;
  • Identifying, developing and recommending success-based strategies to align student expectations with:
    • OYAP and apprenticeship program processes,
    • requirements to advance (if desired) in the selected trade beyond the OYAP program, and
    • future projected labour market demand and earning opportunities in the selected trades, and,
  • Continuing to promote the OYAP program.

Employers and labour market partners are a key component to the success of OYAP and should be included in the Advisory Committee.

Other Advisory Committee members may include/be a member of:

  • Employers/Employer Associations;
  • Chambers of Commerce;
  • OYAP coordinator/DSB supervisory officer;
  • Secondary school teachers /counsellors;
  • Technological education consultant or coordinator;
  • Student Success teacher;
  • Regional Planning Team (SCWI) members;
  • Current OYAP students and graduates;
  • MTCU local Office staff / ETCs;
  • Employment Ontario Employment Service (ES);
  • Board member of the Ontario College of Trades (all levels);
  • Parents/school council;
  • Industry Education Council;
  • Special Education Advisory Committee;
  • Community agencies and associations;
  • Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology;
  • Local Training Boards;
  • Trade unions and associations; and,
  • Marketing or other functional experts.

3.1.4. Ontario College of Trades

The Ontario College of Trades (OCOT) establishes apprenticeship academic and on-the-job training standards. As a result, OCOT decisions and actions may impact elements of OYAP. 

Currently, under the Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009 (OCTAA), all OYAP participants are exempt from the following regulations:

  • Wage rates and ratios: Employers are not subject to regulations related to wage rates and ratios for OYAP participants.
  • Practise of compulsory trades: OYAP participants are permitted to practice restricted skill sets in compulsory trades.

OYAP participants without RTAs are not required to become members of OCOT. OYAP apprentices (i.e. OYAP participants with RTAs) are required to become members of OCOT; however, they are exempt from membership fees while in OYAP. In order for students to be exempt from the membership fees, they are required to have signed and submitted the OYAP Participant Application forms to the DSB.

For more information about OCOT, please visit the Ontario Colleges of Trades website.

The Ontario College of Trades and Apprenticeship Act, 2009(OCTAA) is available online.

3.2. Funding

OYAP funding is provided by MTCU to DSBs to support program delivery. Funding must be used to support the creation and enhancement of labour market partnerships, market the program, and provide student resources and support. Although DSBs may allocate a portion of the total funding towards the salary of an OYAP Coordinator, the duties of the OYAP Coordinator must be directly related to the OYAP. For more information on eligible expenditures, the OYAP Audit & Accountability Requirements can be found on the Employment Ontario Partners Gateway (EOPG).

4. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

4.1. Performance Measures

The following performance measures will be used to measure program progress and success:

  • The percentage of total grade 11 and 12 students who enrol in OYAP;
  • The percentage of OYAP students who become registered apprentices during the program;
  • The percentage of OYAP students who “complete” (obtain their OSSD while maintaining status in OYAP);
  • The percentage of OYAP students who are still registered apprentices at graduation and have continued with their apprenticeship at least six months after graduation; and,
  • The number of employers providing student employment as registered apprentices at graduation.

These performance measures should be used as activities and priorities are planned. Further performance measurement refinements including available data and data collection requirements may be required for continuous improvement such as the collection of new participant profile and performance indicators to capture OYAP’s effectiveness in assisting program participants with multiple barriers.


5. ADMINSTRATION

5.1. Program Assessment

Each DSB is responsible for evaluating the results of the OYAP activities. The program evaluation is required for reporting purposes to MTCU and to assist the Advisory Committee with making decisions related to program effectiveness, identifying improvement opportunities and revising program delivery.

The DSB shall collect and evaluate the following data: 

  • Evaluate the results of program activities, including:
    • Communications and marketing activities
    • Professional development activities delivered
    • DSB partnerships
  • Evaluate individual DSB’s selected performance measures of effectiveness, efficiency, and customer service;
  • Track, evaluate and review OYAP exits prior to withdrawing from the program or prior to graduating/leaving secondary school; and,
  • The following program elements where data is available, must be reviewed: 
  • Number of students applying to OYAP
  • Number of students completing OYAP
  • Number of students leaving OYAP and still completing the OSSD
  • Number of students registered as apprentices
  • Number of employers actively involved on the Advisory Committee
  • Quality of work placement training experiences
  • Percentage of OYAP students who were placed in their preferred trade.

DSBs must have the current contact information for OYAP participants in order to carry out monitoring and/or evaluation activities.

If requested by MTCU, DSBs shall assist MTCU in its evaluation and performance management of the program by:

  • Contacting OYAP participants on behalf of MTCU;
  • Contacting other stakeholders such as employers on behalf of MTCU; and 
  • Participating in evaluation activities conducted by or on behalf of MTCU including surveys, interviews and discussion groups.

5.2. Access to Information and Protection of Privacy

DSBs are responsible for ensuring that the mandatory OYAP Application Form with Notice of Collection and Consent is signed by OYAP participants or their parents/guardians.

DSBs are bound by the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (MFIPPA) and MTCU is bound by the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA).

5.3. Employment Ontario Partners’ Gateway (EOPG)

The Employment Ontario Partners’ Gateway (EOPG) provides support to partners and agencies delivering Employment Ontario projects or services, such as OYAP, as part of the Employment Ontario network. It provides tools and materials to support the Employment Ontario brand, and employment and training information and services within the Employment Ontario network of service providers.

OYAP guidelines, reporting templates, and other documents are available on the EOPG site. DSBs are expected to check the EOPG site regularly for updates. Alternatively, DSBs can sign up for an RSS feed to receive notification of new postings.

5.4. Reporting Requirements

The following are the reporting requirements as outlined in Schedule “D” of the Agreement:

  • An Interim Program Report on activities of the program and progress towards meeting program commitments; and,
  • A Final Program Report with comments on the activities of the program, the achievement of program commitments, successes, and programmatic challenges and how they were addressed.

Please refer to the OYAP Audit & Accountability Requirements for financial reporting requirements at EOPG.

5.5. Deadline for 2017-2018 Business Plans: May 5, 2017

The deadline for submission of the 2017-2018 OYAP Business Plan is May 5, 2017. This supports efficient and effective delivery of services and the need to achieve good accountability practices by having contract agreements in place prior to the start of program delivery in September.

 5.6. Employment Ontario “Find a Service”

In order to provide current information about programs and services, DSBs must update "Find a Service" on the Employment Ontario website with any changes to their organization contact information as follows:

  • Use the link to search for their DSB
  • Click on their DSBs record
  • Click Update for instructions to update their information.

5.7. Procedure for the Addition of OYAP Classes to Seat Purchase Plans

This procedure sets out the process by which DSBs can request MTCU apprenticeship in-school training for their students.

  • DSBs initiate the addition of OYAP classes at approved apprenticeship Training Delivery Agencies (TDAs) by first discussing the potential class with the lead MTCU Employment & Training Consultant (ETC) for their DSB to ensure that the request is approved.
  • Class additions are usually identified as a part of the boards’ OYAP planning process and included in their annual OYAP Business Plan submission to MTCU but classes may be added at other points in the year if necessary.
  • For every class to be added the DSB must complete a Request for OYAP In-School Training form (see next page) providing the details, rationale, and demonstration of need/support for the proposed class and, if applicable, identifying the other DSBs participating. Seat Purchase approvals are valid for one year only.

APPENDIX A: Request for OYAP In-School Training

REQUEST FOR OYAP IN-SCHOOL TRAINING

School Year:  20__ - 20__

Trade code:

Trade name:

Proposed delivery date:

 

Number of Seats

 

Training Delivery Agent:

 

District School Board:

Will students from other DSBs be participating in this training? Please provide details.

Has this program been offered before? Please provide details.

(E.g. How many students were enrolled, how many completed, pass/fail)

Are there local employment opportunities for the trade you are proposing?

How will you select and prepare students for the Level One course?

 

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Name:

 

Phone:

 

Fax:

 

Email:

 

Signature:   

 

Date:

 


APPENDIX B: Glossary of Terms

 

“Advisory Committee” means a committee appointed by the DSB as described in the guidelines.

“Agreement” means the contract agreement entered into between the Ministry and the DSB (Recipient) and includes all of the schedules. Agreements are from September 1st to August 31st of the following year.

“CAAT” means College of Applied Arts and Technology.

“Employer” means the person or organization providing the cooperative education placement for students in OYAP.

“EOIS-APPR” means the Employment Ontario Information System for Apprenticeship which supports the delivery of apprenticeship and certification, case management of clients and reporting of client information to the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.

“Exemption Tests” means an evaluation instrument used to exempt an individual from some or all of the formal instruction requirements (curriculum standard) of his/her apprenticeship training program.

“Funds” means the money the Ministry provides to the DSB (Recipient) pursuant to the Agreement.

“OYAP” means the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program.

“OYAP Participant Application Form” means the Participant Application Form available on the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities website.

“Personalized Placement Learning Plan (PPLP)” means an outline of a student’s learning expectations in a particular cooperative education course or work experience placement.

“Reports” means the reports described in Schedule “D” of the Agreement.

“TDA” means Training Delivery Agent.