Youth Job Link (YJL)
Technical Questions and Answers

Service Components

Career Exploration and Career Management

What is the difference between Career Exploration and Career Management services?

Career exploration services provide youth with an opportunity to explore different career options, increase their knowledge of the labour market and learn more about the educational pathways needed to achieve their career goals.

Career management services, by comparison, provide youth with skills they will need once they enter the labour market and embark on their occupational or career paths. Examples include: obtaining personal management skills, exploring the value of lifelong learning and achieving work-life balance.

Both are delivered in the form of short-duration workshops (less than two days) delivered online or in-person and individually or in a group setting.

Job Search, Job Readiness and Job Matching

What is the difference between Job Search and Job Readiness services?

Job search services help youth develop the skills necessary to conduct an effective and independent job search (e.g. resume building, interviewing, web-based job searching, etc.)

Job readiness services, by comparison, help youth develop the skills they need on the job to effectively integrate into the workforce (e.g. health and safety training, customer service, teamwork, conflict resolution, etc.)

Both are delivered in the form of short-duration workshops (less than two days) delivered online or in-person and individually or in a group setting.

What is the difference between job matching offered through Youth Job Link and job matching offered through the Employment Service?

Job matching through Youth Job Link closely aligns with existing job matching services through the Resource and Information component of the Employment Service. This involves service providers making non-intensive employment connections between youth and employers (i.e. does not involve service planning or client case management).

Service providers are expected to provide the following job matching services to youth:

    • Basic client triage focused on identifying employment-related interests and skills;
    • Generating job leads, based on identified interests and skills;
    • Supporting youth participants, as needed, with completing applications, submitting resumes and developing interview skills; and,
    • Providing information on the Employment Standards Act, Occupational Health and Safety Act, Workplace Hazardous Material Information System etc.

The service provider is also expected to provide the following services to employers:

  • Advertising employment opportunities;
  • Assisting with identifying potentially suitable clients for job vacancies;
  • Providing information on the Employment Standards Act, Occupational Health and Safety Act, Workplace Hazardous Material Information System etc.

Unlike Employment Service job placements, YJL job matches do not require an employer site visit for job matches. However, as noted above, each job matched youth and employer should be provided with workplace safety information, including rights and responsibilities of individuals. With the employer’s permission, service providers may conduct a site visit to the employer. This is however not a requirement.

Are there job placements associated with job matching through Youth Job Link?

No, Youth Job Link does not have a job placement component. Youth requiring assisted job placement services can be referred to the Employment Service or Youth Job Connection, depending on their assessed level of need.

Incentives and Supports

What financial incentives and supports are available to youth and employers through Youth Job Link?

Under the job matching component of Youth Job Link (YJL), up to $300 per participant is available for a combination of Individual-focused Employment Supports and Employer Incentives.

Individual-focused Employment Supports are available to provide additional assistance for youth who may need more help finding and keeping a job, and who have no previous work experience, including work outside of Canada. Employment supports could include offsetting initial employment-related costs such as travel, equipment and clothing. Service providers are not required to use the Market Basket Measure (MBM) threshold by MBM region/LICO to provide supports under YJL.

Up to $600 is available to youth with disabilities who require additional employment supports (e.g. assistive devices and adaptive technologies). These supports would be in addition to the maximum $300 Individual-focused Employment Supports (for a maximum of up to $900 in support) available to youth clients. Youth clients would be able to keep any purchased assisted devices and/or adaptive technologies.

The Employer Incentives are intended to encourage employers to hire youth identified by the service provider who are unable to make job linkages themselves.  The youth must also have no previous work experience. Employer Incentives are intended to offset the costs of on-the-job-training, new employee orientation and other hiring-related costs. The employer incentive is not a wage subsidy.

Service providers may exercise their discretion in negotiating incentives and supports for youth and employers, up to the maximum $300 allowed, based on identified needs.

Can incentives and supports be used for volunteer or unpaid job matches?

No. YJL incentives and supports can only be used for youth that have been matched with an employer, by the service provider, for a paid job.

Why are youth ages 15 to 19 targeted for incentives and supports?

The unemployment rate for youth ages 15 to 19 is significantly higher than the unemployment rate for the remainder of the youth population. Individual supports and employer incentives could support more job matches for this portion of the youth demographic.

Why are students targeted for incentives and supports?

While Youth Job Link is available to all youth ages 15 to 29, a key focus is helping students find summer employment or part-time jobs during the school year.

Unemployed youth who are not in school can access a range of other Employment Ontario services, including Youth Job Connection and the Employment Service.

At the same time, research shows that students significantly improve their ability to transition to the labour market post-graduation when they work while studying.

Individual-focused Employment Supports and Employer Incentives could support more job matches for students looking to gain summer or part-time work experience while in school.

Why are youth that may be affected by market perception issues targeted for incentives and supports?

Individual-focused Employment Supports and Employer Incentives are available to provide additional assistance for youth with few barriers to employment who may need more help finding and keeping a job.

In some cases, employers may have negative biases or perceptions of a youth and their ability to perform on the job (e.g. neighbourhood where the youth resides, time out of school, work or training and youth with disabilities). These supports and incentives could help facilitate more job matches, for instance by providing employers with an incentive to give those youth a chance to demonstrate their capabilities.

Why are youth from a disadvantaged economic background targeted for incentives and supports?

Youth from a disadvantaged economic background may have greater difficulty finding and keeping a job. The supports may help them cover transportation or other work-related costs that they would otherwise not be able to afford and that could be a barrier to them connecting with the labour market.

Why are rural and remote communities targeted for incentives and supports?

Employment in rural and remote communities can present challenges due to large geographic distances between home and work and limited public transportation. Individual supports could encourage more job matching in rural and remote communities by helping to offset travel-related costs (e.g. offsetting initial travel costs incurred by youth until they receive their first paycheque).

Why are small employers with ten or fewer staff targeted for Employer Incentives?

Small employers may have less capacity and resources available to effectively recruit for their workforces than larger employers. Employer Incentives could help facilitate more job matches between small employers and youth.

Why are not-for-profit employers targeted for Employer Incentives?

Limited financial resources can impact the ability of not-for-profit employers to recruit for their workforces. Employer Incentives could help facilitate more job matches in the not-for-profit sector.

Are there any other exceptions to the $300 maximum for Individual-focused Employment Supports or employer incentives?

With the exception of additional supports for youth with disabilities, the $300 maximum for incentives and supports cannot be exceeded.

Service providers can allocate up to $600 per client with a disability requiring employment support (for a maximum of $900 in total support). Disability support is in addition to the individual support and cannot be put towards additional employer incentives. Youth may keep purchased assistive devices following their participation in Youth Job Link. The disability support may also be used to pay for translator/interpretive services related to a disability accommodation.

Documenting Incentives and Supports

What information and documentation will be required from service providers to support incentives and supports funding decisions? 

For Individual-focused Employment Supports, service providers should capture all the indicators that would support their decision to provide supports through the Participant Information Form, in the following fields:

    • Date of birth (youth ages 15 to 19)
    • Labour market attachment (student status)
    • Market perception issues
    • Disadvantaged economic background
    • Rural and remote community

For Employer Incentives, service providers should capture information regarding the employer size and business type on the Employer Information and Incentive Form to support their decision to provide incentives to that employer.

For both Individual-focused Employment Supports and employer incentives, the information captured on the forms should indicate that the client or employer meets the profile of individuals or organizations with the most need for incentives and supports.

Additional details on market perception issues and disadvantaged economic background criteria can be added to the client case file if required.

When should service providers be flowing incentives to the employer?

If the service provider has determined that an employer should receive an incentive for hiring a youth identified by the service provider, the service provider must ensure they meet all the appropriate documentation requirements before flowing funding to the employer.

The service provider must ensure the Employer Information and Incentive form is completed, signed and dated before they provide the employer with the incentives.

Incentives should only be flowed to the employer if the employer does hire and pay the YJL client. Service providers may flow the funding before the job match starts or before the client has received their first pay cheque. As per the Employer Information and Incentive form, the employer commits to hiring and putting the YJL client on their payroll, as well as informing the service provider if there is any change of plans that might affect their eligibility to receive the incentive.

Service providers are responsible for developing their own business processes to determine when the most appropriate time is to flow the incentives to employers.

Where will youth and employer information on the use of incentives and supports be captured?

Information on Individual-focused Employment Supports will be captured on the Participant Information Form.

Details on employer incentives will be captured on the Employer Information and Incentive form.

Service providers providing supports to youth whose employer is not receiving incentives should ensure key employer information is captured on the Participant Information form.

Service providers will enter individual and employer information related to Individual-focused Employment Supports and Employer Incentives into Employment Ontario Information System-Case Management System (EOIS-CaMS).

Performance Management

How will performance for Youth Job Link be managed?

Service providers will be required to meet the same service quality standards for customer satisfaction and efficiency as the Employment Service. 

Customer Satisfaction:

  • Service providers will be required to measure employer and youth customer satisfaction, with a minimum requirement of 15 per cent response rate and 90 per cent satisfaction rate.

Efficiency:

  • Service providers will be required to measure and meet a minimum 100 per cent of their performance target for:
    • Total Intake in YJL Resource and Information (RI) Sessions/Workshops Activity; and,
    • Total Job Matching Supports and Incentives.

Service providers will be required to report on the Intake in YJL RI Activity at an aggregate level, while the details on participants and employers will need to be reported on for job matches with supports and incentives.

Eligibility

Which youth are eligible to access Youth Job Link services and supports?

All youth, including students, aged 15 to 29, are eligible for Youth Job Link services.

Youth accessing job matching services must also:

    • reside in Ontario, and
    • be eligible to work in Canada.

To access Youth Job Link Individual-focused Employment Supports offered as part of the job matching service, youth must also have no previous work experience (i.e. have not been put on an employer’s payroll and received wages, or have worked for less than one week). As a result, youth may only access these employment supports once (i.e. a student could not access employment supports in successive summers).

Section 3.2.3 of the program guidelines also includes the following list of criteria that service providers should use to prioritize the use of supports and incentives:

    • youth ages 15 to 19
    • student status
    • market perceptions
    • disadvantaged economic background
    • rural and remote communities

Please note, these criteria are not eligibility requirements (ie. youth aged 20 to 29 are still eligible for incentives and supports). They should be used by service providers to manage their flow-through funding and develop their funding decision-making model.

Which employers are eligible to access Youth Job Link services and incentives?

Youth Job Link’s job matching services are available to all employers.

To access the employer incentive, employers must:

  • Hire individuals identified by the service provider (i.e. an employer cannot select youth on their own and bring them to the service provider for hiring incentive), and
  • Be licensed to operate in Ontario.

An employer must not:

    • Be a federal, provincial or municipal government and/or agency;
    • Be a designated broader public sector organization, as defined by the Broader Public Sector Accountability Act;
    • Be an Employment Service provider;
    • Be currently in receipt of other government funds related to the hiring or placement of the same individual (e.g. Employment Service or Youth Job Connection); and
    • Use staff hired using financial incentives to displace existing staff or staff who are on lay-off.

The employer can also receive a financial incentive related to a match of an eligible youth if the youth:

    • is not their immediate relative (e.g. son, daughter, spouse, brother, sister); and,
    • is not currently working for them.

Section 3.2.3 of the program guidelines also includes the following list of criteria that service providers should use to prioritize the use of Employer Incentives:

  • small employers
  • not-for-profit employers

Service providers must also consider the characteristics of the youth matched with the employer when making their funding decisions. Employer Incentives should not be provided unless the youth matched with the employer is determined to be a priority as defined in section 3.2.3 of the YJL guidelines.

Are service providers required to verify the age of each youth accessing YJL? Which date is used to determine age eligibility for youth who are turning 30?

Service providers are not expected to verify the age of youth accessing resource and information services and supports under Youth Job Link (YJL). They must offer workshop/information sessions targeted towards youth and clearly identify the target group to ensure the appropriate audience attends them. Service providers are, however, required to verify and document the age of youth accessing incentives or supports as part of a YJL job match.

A youth is eligible as long as they are under 30 the day they register for YJL. Individuals over the age of 30 can receive services through the Employment Service.

Can a client who does not have an address, a SIN or government identification access Youth Job Link?

All youth are eligible to access Youth Job Link resources and information workshops, including those with no address or identification.

In order to receive job matching services, including Individual-focused Employment Supports, a client must be able to demonstrate their age, Ontario residency and eligibility to work in Canada. Service providers will refer individuals to the appropriate community services should additional supports be required.

Youth with no SIN or a 900-series SIN can access all Youth Job Link services and supports, except for the job matching services.

What information must a service provider collect to determine eligibility for the program?

To access employment resources and information workshops through Youth Job Link, individuals must be between the ages of 15 and 29. Service providers are not expected to verify the age of youth accessing resource and information services and supports under Youth Job Link (YJL). They must offer workshop/information sessions targeted towards youth and clearly identify the target group to ensure the appropriate audience attends them.

Youth or employers accessing Individual-focused Employment Supports, or Employer Incentives as part of job matching services, must provide additional information, which will be documented in EOIS-CaMS.

The youth match information will be collected on the Participant Information form. If their employer is not receiving incentives, basic employer information will be captured on that form as well. If the employer they have been matched with will benefit from Employer Incentives, the Employer Information and Incentive form will collect the information required. Information collected includes:

  • Client tombstone data (e.g. name, address, contact information)
  • Name and contact information of the employer;
  • Job match information (e.g. occupation title, wage amount, start date);
  • Amount of Employer Incentive and/or Individual-focused Employment Supports;
  • Attestation from client pertaining to lack of work experience requirement. 

Individuals may only access Youth Job Link financial supports once. Therefore, if a client’s data is already recorded in EOIS-CaMS because the client has already accessed Youth Job Link supports, they are not eligible to receive further financial supports through this program.

Program Delivery

Given the program’s focus on youth, including students, what are the ministry’s expectations with respect to hours of operation?

Service providers are expected to adopt a customer-centric approach to program delivery. They must ensure their hours and days of operation meet the needs of their client target group during the summer and throughout the rest of the year.

What methods of delivery can service providers employ for Youth Job Link?

In addition to on-site delivery, service providers can deliver Youth Job Link using itinerant or mobile service locations, which can be especially effective for rural and remote communities. Service providers are also encouraged to provide virtual (i.e. web-based) resource and information services as part of program delivery.

Funding Allocations and Client Targets

How were funding allocations and client targets determined?

To ensure adequate and consistent service, Youth Job Link funding allocations and client targets were determined based on the current level of Employment Service (ES) funding, including the Resource and Information (RI) component.

All YJL sites will receive a YJL allocation based on the size of their April 2015 ES operating budget.

In determining the level of funding and activity for ES service delivery sites, a number of variables are considered including population, location, labour market environment and economies of scale.

Is the operational funding intended to be applied to the direct delivery of Youth Job Link services, administrative activities, or both?

Service providers receive operating funds for the day-to-day operational costs for direct delivery of the Youth Job Link program.  These costs include:

  • Staff and management salaries, wages and benefits;
  • Hiring and training of staff (including professional development);
  • Marketing (signage, print/web ads, outreach, etc.);
  • Facilities (rent); and
  • Other direct operating expenditures related to program delivery.

Service providers can apply a maximum of 15 per cent of the operating budget to administrative overhead costs.  Administrative overhead costs are costs necessary for operating an organization, but not directly associated with the delivery of Youth Job Link.  For example, this can include a portion of the salaries and benefits of the Executive Director, Information Technology or Human Resources staff who work for the entire organization, but spend a portion of their time dedicated to administrative functions that support the program.

Operating funds cannot be used for termination and severance costs.