Marketing Management Program Standard

The approved program standard for two-semester post-diploma Marketing Management Programs approved by the Ministry of Education and Training (MCU Code 72900) for delivery by Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology

Ministry of Education and Training, June 1997

© 1997, Ontario Ministry of Education and Training

ISBN 0-7778-6578-5


Acknowledgments

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction


  2. Vocational Standard


Acknowledgments

The Ministry of Education and Training acknowledges with thanks the significant contribution of the many individuals and organizations who participated in the development of this program standard. In particular, the Ministry of Education and Training would like to acknowledge the important roles of:

  • Members of the Marketing Program Standards Committee: Jack Bouschear, Sault College; Gerard Chalifoux, Northern College; Neil Chartrand, St. Clair College; Jim Coughlin, Sir Sandford Fleming College; Joan Curran, Association of Canadian Advertisers; Betty Freelandt, Cambrian College; Marc Gonthier, American Marketing Association, Toronto Chapter; Clarence Potvin, Collège Boréal; Marilyn Stewart, Stewart Consulting Group; Theresa Szkwara, T. Eaton Company; Tom Thorne, Loyalist College; and Gary Weaver, Durham College.

  • The many individuals and organizations who participated in consultations with the committee; the writer/editor, Brian Provini, Conestoga College; and the secondee who led the development of the vocational standard: Ken Reynolds, St. Clair College.

I. Introduction

This document is the Program Standard for Marketing Management Programs delivered by Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology. The program standard applies to all programs approved by the Ministry of Education and Training under MCU code 72900.

Development of System-Wide Program Standards

The Government of Ontario initiated program standards development with the objectives of bringing a greater degree of consistency to college programming offered across the province, broadening the focus of college programs to ensure graduates have the skills to be flexible and to continue to learn and adapt, and providing public accountability for the quality and relevance of college programs.

This mandate was initially carried out as the work of the College Standards and Accreditation Council (CSAC), established in 1993.

Effective September 1, 1996, CSAC was disbanded as a government agency and its standards-setting and accreditation functions were integrated into the Ministry of Education and Training. The Colleges Branch of the Ministry of Education and Training has now assumed responsibility for the development and approval of system-wide standards for programs at colleges of applied arts and technology of Ontario.

Program Standards

Program standards apply to all similar programs offered by colleges across the province. The program standard for a post-diploma program is made up of the vocationally specific learning outcomes which apply to the program in question.

These outline the essential skills and knowledge that a student must reliably demonstrate in order to graduate from the program. It is assumed that students, upon entering a post-diploma program, will have achieved the necessary generic skills and general education by having completed a previous certificate, diploma, or other credential-granting program of study.

Individual colleges of applied arts and technology offering the program determine the specific program structure, delivery methods, and other curriculum matters to be used in assisting students to achieve the outcomes articulated in the standard. Individual colleges also determine whether additional local learning outcomes will be required to reflect specific local needs and/or interests.

The Expression of Program Standards as Learning Outcomes

Post-diploma program standards are expressed in terms of learning outcomes.

Learning outcomes represent culminating demonstrations of learning and achievement. They are not simply a listing of discrete skills, nor broad statements of knowledge and comprehension. In addition, learning outcomes are interrelated and cannot be viewed in isolation of one another. As such, they should be viewed as a comprehensive whole. They describe performances that demonstrate that significant integrated learning by graduates of the program has been achieved and verified.

Expressing standards as learning outcomes ensures consistency in the outcomes for program graduates, while leaving to the discretion of individual colleges curriculum matters such as the specific program structure and delivery methods.

The Presentation of the Learning Outcomes

The learning outcome statement sets out the culminating demonstration of learning and achievement that the student must reliably demonstrate before graduation.

The elements of performance for each outcome define and clarify the level and quality of performance necessary to meet the requirements of the learning outcome. However, it is the performance of the learning outcome itself on which students are evaluated. The elements are indicators of the means by which the student may proceed to satisfactory performance of the learning outcome. The elements do not stand alone but rather in reference to the learning outcome of which they form a part.

In some cases, in order to ensure clarity, an explanation of the outcome is also provided.

The Accreditation of Programs

The Ministry of Education and Training will establish a process to accredit college programs, with the objective of determining whether program graduates have achieved the learning outcomes established in a program standard.

The Development of a Program Standard

A program standard is developed through a broad consultation process involving a range of stakeholders with a direct interest in the program area, including employers, professional associations, universities, secondary schools, and program graduates working in the field, in addition to students, faculty, and administrators at the colleges themselves. It represents a consensus of participating stakeholders on the essential learning that all program graduates should have achieved.

Updating the Program Standard

The Ministry of Education and Training will undertake regular reviews of the vocational learning outcomes for this program to ensure that the Marketing Management Program Standard remains appropriate and relevant to the needs of students and employers across the Province of Ontario. To confirm that this document is the most up-to-date release for this program, contact the Ministry of Education and Training at the address or telephone number indicated in the document entitled College Program Standards – Introduction.

Table of Contents


II. Vocational Standard

All graduates of Marketing Management Programs must have achieved the sixteen vocational learning outcomes listed in the following pages.

Preamble

Graduates of Marketing Management Programs carry out marketing functions within the Canadian business environment. Graduates have therefore demonstrated achievement of vocational learning outcomes which relate to both business in general and marketing in particular.

As this is a post-diploma program, students will have completed a college diploma or university degree program or have acquired substantial relevant employment experience prior to acceptance into the program. Upon successful completion of the Marketing Management Program, graduates are able to apply planning, assessment, analysis, communication, sales, teamwork, research, and mathematical skills and employ supervisory techniques to support the marketing activities of an organization.

Graduates of Marketing Management Programs work in a broad range of employment settings in all sectors of business and industry, both domestic and international, including retailers, banks and other financial institutions, government offices, marketing consulting firms, advertising agencies, market research firms, and small businesses.

There are opportunities for graduates to pursue further educational qualifications; through articulation agreements between the colleges and universities, graduates may be granted credits towards a degree. Students should contact individual colleges for further details of a college's articulation agreements with universities.

The Vocational Learning Outcomes

Please see the Glossary of Terms for definitions of words marked with an asterisk (*) in the sections below.

1. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

develop a promotion mix* for marketing* a product* or service based on an identified target market.

Elements of the Performance

  • Select the appropriate medium or media for the marketing of a particular product or service
  • Employ a variety of creative strategies in marketing projects
  • Analyze statistical data in such areas as past sales, buying habits, consumer* preferences, competitors' products, and location demographics
  • Create and administer direct marketing*
  • Apply the concepts of promotion for a variety of products or services
  • Employ knowledge of segmentation in targeting customers
  • Incorporate evolving technologies (e.g., internet, multimedia) into the promotional plan

* See glossary

2. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

develop pricing strategies which take into account perceived value, competitive pressures, and corporate objectives.

Elements of the Performance

  • Consider the prices of competing products* when establishing a price
  • Identify supply and demand as elements in pricing
  • Use statistical data in such areas as past sales, buying habits, consumer* preferences, competitors' products, and location demographics
  • Apply the fundamental concepts of pricing for a variety of products or services

* See glossary

3. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

develop strategies for the efficient distribution of products* and services.

Elements of the Performance

  • Identify distribution channels* and alternative approaches to distribution
  • Identify product availability as a source of competitive advantage
  • Determine the appropriate merchandising strategies for a product
  • Recognize the role of internal and external partnerships within the channels of distribution
  • Recommend appropriate strategies to manage logistical problems and opportunities

* See glossary

4. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

determine strategies for developing new products* and services that are consistent with evolving market needs.

Elements of the Performance

  • Identify how the nature of a product or service affects its lifecycle*
  • Take into account segmentation in targeting customers
  • Describe how new product development* and product modification affect an organization’s ability to remain competitive
  • Recognize the impact of demographics on the development of new products and services

* See glossary

5. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

evaluate results of marketing* activities using criteria related to budgeted sales, costs, and profits.

Elements of the Performance

  • Apply the principles of entrepreneurship* to the evaluation of marketing activities
  • Identify types of budgets and their uses
  • Compare actual to projected cost/benefits for all marketing initiatives
  • Compare actual market share to projected market share
  • Calculate a return on investment

* See glossary

6. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

formulate a marketing* plan including marketing objectives, marketing mix*, strategies, budgetary considerations, and evaluation criteria.

Elements of the Performance

  • Prepare an environmental scan*
  • Demonstrate knowledge of market segments
  • Use secondary data* in the preparation of a marketing plan
  • Evaluate the marketing environment, market segmentation, and other variables
  • Apply knowledge of customer/client behaviour in the design of a marketing plan or strategy
  • Analyze the impact of economic, technological, competitive, environmental, social, political, and cultural* aspects of society on marketing initiatives
  • Apply the principles of entrepreneurship* to a marketing plan
  • Select the appropriate promotional mix* for the marketing of a particular product* or service
  • Develop a marketing plan based on an integration of product, price, place, and promotion

* See glossary

7. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

communicate marketing* information persuasively and accurately in oral, written and graphic* formats.

Elements of the Performance

  • Use presentation software, where appropriate, to improve the clarity and impact of a presentation
  • Present and defend marketing plans to promote the successful operation of an enterprise
  • Speak and write clearly, concisely, and logically
  • Prepare written and oral formal and informal reports to enhance the quality of service
  • Use E-mail appropriately to communicate effectively
  • Participate in the development of graphics, such as storyboards, desktop publishing, illustrations, art work, clip art, web sites.

* See glossary

8. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

prepare and deliver a sales presentation.

Elements of the Performance

  • Preplan, prepare, and deliver a sales presentation
  • Use all available resources (e.g., presentation software, samples, visual aids) to improve the clarity and impact of a sales presentation
  • Qualify the customer, approach the customer, present the product or service (demonstrate where appropriate), manage sales resistance, close the sale and follow up after the sale

* See glossary

9. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

evaluate the viability of marketing* a product* or service in an international market or markets.

Elements of the Performance

  • Identify the role of cultural* differences, political environments, population demographics, and economic environments in international marketing decisions
  • Apply the principles of marketing management to issues of the international market
  • Identify distribution opportunities within the international market
  • Analyze the impact of economic, technological, competitive, environmental, social, political, and cultural* aspects of society on marketing initiatives
  • Develop an international marketing plan based on an integration of product, price, place and promotion
  • Recognize the various methods of entering the international market, such as exporting, licensing, joint venturing, direct investment, or management contracting

* See glossary

10. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

conduct primary research on market conditions in order to determine existing and potential levels of activity for particular products* and services.

Elements of the Performance

  • Identify the decision(s) to be made
  • Identify the primary data required
  • Select appropriate data collection strategies
  • Prepare, compile, and analyze information based on primary market research

* See glossary

11. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

apply human resource and leadership knowledge and skills to enhance performance with individuals and teams to contribute to the successful marketing* function of an enterprise.

Elements of the Performance

  • Use effective interpersonal skills for the workplace to assist the completion of individual and team tasks and to promote the image of the organization
  • Recognize individual responsibility for results
  • Understand own role in success of the organization
  • Apply project management skills and techniques when working with a team
  • Collaborate with co-workers, supervisors and others

* See glossary

12. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

employ marketing* management techniques in the planning, directing, and controlling of an enterprise.

Elements of the Performance

  • Conduct a marketing audit
  • Analyze the impact of economic variables on the operations of an enterprise in general and the marketing function in particular
  • Contribute to marketing effectiveness and employ selling techniques to promote the successful operation of an enterprise
  • Contribute to the effective coordination of the activity of the marketing department with the operations of other functional areas of an enterprise

* See glossary

13. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

develop personal professional development strategies and plans to enhance leadership, management skills, and marketing* expertise.

Elements of the Performance

  • Solicit and use constructive feedback in the evaluation of personal knowledge and skills
  • Identify areas for ongoing growth and development
  • Incorporate various methods of increasing professional knowledge and skills into a professional development plan
  • Recognize the value of membership in professional associations
  • Identify various methods of increasing professional knowledge and skills

* See glossary

14. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

develop strategies to establish working relationships with clients, customers, and consumers* which maintain and strengthen their loyalty to his/her organization.

Elements of the Performance

  • Determine ways to improve the organization's ability to meet customer and client needs
  • Cultivate a relationship with all clients based on a thorough knowledge of the clients and their needs
  • Use appropriate information technologies to maintain accurate and timely information on all clients, customers, and consumers
  • Appreciate the importance of business ethics and corporate social responsibility

* See glossary

15. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

apply the principles of business ethics and corporate social responsibility.

Elements of the Performance

  • Develop strategies which adhere to ethical principles and laws relating to business practices in general and to marketing* in particular
  • Establish professional and personal relationships which adhere to legal, ethical, and prevailing acceptable cultural* standards
  • Consider potential consequences to the environment* for each activity
  • Define and provide examples of conflict of interest
  • Develop strategies to address ethical, moral, and legal issues
  • Identify the marketing advantages of corporate social responsibility
  • Conduct all business in an ethical, responsible and legal manner

* See glossary

16. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

prepare the marketing* component of a business plan.

Elements of the Performance

  • Identify the key components of a business plan
  • Utilize sales forecasting techniques
  • Demonstrate understanding of various strategies and their effects on sales and profits and be able to recommend appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Prepare a basic pro-forma financial statement using sound financial accounting practices
  • Understand and discuss the major forces at work in the economy and how they affect business
  • Prepare a cost/benefit analysis for all marketing initiatives
  • Calculate a return on investment
  • Apply the principles of entrepreneurship* to the preparation of a business plan

Table of Contents


Synopsis of the Vocational Learning Outcomes

The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

  1. develop a promotion mix* for marketing* a product* or service based on an identified target market.
  2. develop pricing strategies which take into account perceived value, competitive pressures, and corporate objectives.
  3. develop strategies for the efficient distribution of products* and services.
  4. determine strategies for developing new products* and services that are consistent with evolving market needs.
  5. evaluate results of marketing* activities using criteria related to budgeted sales, costs, and profits.
  6. formulate a marketing* plan including marketing objectives, marketing mix*, strategies, budgetary considerations, and evaluation criteria.
  7. communicate marketing* information persuasively and accurately in oral, written, and graphic* formats.
  8. prepare and deliver a sales presentation.
  9. evaluate the viability of marketing* a product* or service in an international market or markets.
  10. conduct primary research on market conditions in order to determine existing and potential levels of activity for particular products* and services.
  11. apply human resource and leadership knowledge and skills to enhance performance with individuals and teams to contribute to the successful marketing* function of an enterprise.
  12. employ marketing* management techniques in the planning, directing, and controlling of an enterprise.
  13. develop personal professional development strategies and plans to enhance leadership, management skills, and marketing* expertise.
  14. develop strategies to establish working relationships with clients, customers, and consumers* which maintain and strengthen their loyalty to his/her organization.
  15. apply the principles of business ethics and corporate social responsibility.
  16. prepare the marketing* component of a business plan.

Note: The learning outcomes have been numbered as a point of reference; numbering does not imply prioritization, sequencing, nor weighting of significance.

Table of Contents


Glossary of Terms

Advertising
paid promotion of products, services, or ideas with an identified sponsor.

Consumer
the person buying a product or service for individual consumption.

Cultural
relating to the set of shared values and behaviours within a society.

Direct Marketing
the interactive relationship between the marketer and the end user.

Distribution Channel
individuals or organizations that participate in the flow of goods or services from the producer to the consumer.

Entrepreneurship
the act of organizing, leading, and assuming the risks of a business, organization, or enterprise in a creative or innovative manner.

Environment
the physical, psychological, and social surroundings.

Environmental Scan
a study of the forces close to a company that affect its ability to serve its customers, as well as the larger demographic, economic, natural, technological, cultural, and political forces.

Graphic
depicted using drawings, photographs, or other visual illustrations.

Internal Customer
a person within an organization who uses or depends on a product or service provided by others within the same organization.

Lifecycle
the stages of a product's sales and profits over its lifetime, consisting of development, introduction, growth, maturity and decline.

Marketing
the act of directing need-satisfying goods and services from a producer to a customer or client by anticipating and reacting to consumer needs.

Marketing Mix
the set of marketing variables that an organization uses to achieve the desired results.

Marketing Research
the design, collection, analysis, and communication of, information related to the marketing function of an organization.

Marketing Strategy
the specific methods to be used by an organization to meet its marketing objectives. It may include target markets, product mix, and budgets.

Personal Selling
oral presentation made to one or more potential customers with the intention of making a sale.

Primary Data
information collected specifically for a particular application or situation by surveying potential customers regarding preferences, knowledge, and buying habits.

Product
something which can be offered to satisfy a want or need, including tangible objects, ideas, destinations, and services.

Product Development
the development of new products and modifications to existing products resulting from the organization's research and development activities.

Promotion Mix
the mix of public relations, advertising, personal selling, direct marketing, and promotion a company uses to meet its marketing goals.

Secondary Data
information that has already been gathered for another purpose.