Manufacturing Engineering Technician Program Standard

The approved program standard for four-semester Manufacturing Engineering Technician Programs approved by the Ministry of Education and Training (MCU Code 57000) for delivery by Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology

Ministry of Education and Training, October 1997

© 1997, Ontario Ministry of Education and Training

ISBN 0-7778-7165-3


Acknowledgments

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction


  2. Vocational Standard


  3. Generic Skills Standard


  4. General Education Standard


Acknowledgments

The Ministry of Education and Training acknowledges with thanks the significant contribution of the many individuals and organizations who participated in the development of this program standard. In particular, the Ministry of Education and Training would like to acknowledge the important roles of:

  • Members of the Mechanical Engineering Program Standards Committee who developed program standards for a cluster of mechanical engineering programs, including manufacturing engineering: Kathy Arcuri-Arnott (graduate technologist); John Bisset (Durham College); Wayne Boicey (Loyalist College); Peter Casey (Algonquin College); Anne Cool (Husky Injection Molding); Ron Cordery (OACETT)); Harry Johnson (Northern College); Martyn Lear (Pratt & Whitney); Judith Little (Waterloo County Board of Education); Dave Roberts (Cambrian College); Riadh Sabir (Sheridan College); Jenny Ono Suttaby (Society of Manufacturing Engineers); Dan Tannous (Manor Tool); Michel Theriault (Davtair Industries); Tom Tomassi (George Brown College); Brian Wilcox (Kvaerner Metals); and Carl Zajc (Fanshawe College).

  • The many individuals and organizations who participated in consultations with the committee; the writer/editor, Brian Provini (Conestoga College); and the secondee who led the development of the vocational standard, Donna Russett (George Brown College).

  • All those involved in the work of the CSAC Generic Skills Council and the development of the generic skills standard.

  • All those involved in the work of the CSAC General Education Council and the development of the general education standard.

I. Introduction

This document is the Program Standard for Manufacturing Engineering Technician Programs delivered by Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology. The program standard applies to all programs approved by the Ministry of Education and Training under MCU Code 57000.

Development of System-Wide Program Standards

The Government of Ontario initiated program standards development with the objectives of bringing a greater degree of consistency to college programming offered across the province, broadening the focus of college programs to ensure graduates have the skills to be flexible and to continue to learn and adapt, and providing public accountability for the quality and relevance of college programs.

This mandate was initially carried out as the work of the College Standards and Accreditation Council (CSAC), established in 1993.

Effective September 1, 1996, CSAC was disbanded as a government agency and its standards-setting and accreditation functions were integrated into the Ministry of Education and Training. The Colleges Branch of the Ministry of Education and Training has now assumed responsibility for the development and approval of system-wide standards for programs at colleges of applied arts and technology of Ontario.

Program Standards

Program standards apply to all similar programs offered by colleges across the province. Each program standard for a postsecondary program includes the following elements:

  • Vocational standard (the vocationally specific learning outcomes which apply to the program in question),
  • Generic skills standard (the generic skills learning outcomes which apply to programs of similar length), and
  • General education standard (the requirement for general education courses that applies to postsecondary programs).

Collectively, these elements outline the essential skills and knowledge that a student must reliably demonstrate in order to graduate from the program.

Individual colleges of applied arts and technology offering the program determine the specific program structure, delivery methods, and other curriculum matters to be used in assisting students to achieve the outcomes articulated in the standard. Individual colleges also determine whether additional local learning outcomes will be required to reflect specific local needs and/or interests.

The Expression of Program Standards as Learning Outcomes

The vocational and generic skills components of program standards are expressed in terms of learning outcomes.

Learning outcomes represent culminating demonstrations of learning and achievement. They are not simply a listing of discrete skills, nor broad statements of knowledge and comprehension. In addition, learning outcomes are interrelated and cannot be viewed in isolation of one another. As such, they should be viewed as a comprehensive whole. They describe performances that demonstrate that significant integrated learning by graduates of the program has been achieved and verified.

Expressing standards as learning outcomes ensures consistency in the outcomes for program graduates, while leaving to the discretion of individual colleges curriculum matters such as the specific program structure and delivery methods.

The Presentation of the Learning Outcomes

The learning outcome statement sets out the culminating demonstration of learning and achievement that the student must reliably demonstrate before graduation.

The elements of performance for each outcome define and clarify the level and quality of performance necessary to meet the requirements of the learning outcome. However, it is the performance of the learning outcome itself on which students are evaluated. The elements are indicators of the means by which the student may proceed to satisfactory performance of the learning outcome. The elements do not stand alone but rather in reference to the learning outcome of which they form a part.

In some cases, in order to ensure clarity, an explanation of the outcome is also provided.

The Accreditation of Programs

The Ministry of Education and Training will establish a process to accredit college programs, with the objective of determining whether program graduates have achieved the learning outcomes and general education requirement established in a program standard.

The Development of a Program Standard

In establishing the standards development initiative, the Government determined that all postsecondary programs should include vocational skills coupled with a broader set of essential skills. This combination is considered critical to ensuring that college graduates have the skills required to be successful both upon graduation from the college program and throughout their working and personal lives.

A program standard is developed through a broad consultation process involving a range of stakeholders with a direct interest in the program area, including employers, professional associations, universities, secondary schools, and program graduates working in the field, in addition to students, faculty, and administrators at the colleges themselves. It represents a consensus of participating stakeholders on the essential learning that all program graduates should have achieved.

Updating the Program Standard

The Ministry of Education and Training will undertake regular reviews of the vocational learning outcomes for this program, as well as a review of the generic skills learning outcomes and the general education requirement, to ensure that the Manufacturing Engineering Technician Program Standard remains appropriate and relevant to the needs of students and employers across the Province of Ontario. To confirm that this document is the most up-to-date release, contact the Ministry of Education and Training at the address or telephone number noted on the document entitled College Program Standards – Introduction.

Table of Contents


II. Vocational Standard

All graduates of Manufacturing Engineering Technician Programs must have achieved the eleven vocational learning outcomes listed in the following pages, in addition to achieving the generic skills learning outcomes and meeting the general education requirement.

Preamble

Graduates of Manufacturing Engineering Technician Programs carry out manufacturing engineering functions within an engineering environment. Graduates have demonstrated achievement of vocational learning outcomes which relate to engineering in general and manufacturing engineering in particular.

Graduates of the two-year Manufacturing Engineering Technician Programs are prepared to perform drafting and analysis functions to support design and production in a manufacturing environment, as well as carry out manufacturing and quality control procedures. They are also able to apply communication, documentation, computer applications, information technology, and teamwork skills to support the engineering activities of an organization.

Graduates of Manufacturing Engineering Technician Programs work in a broad range of employment settings in a variety of sectors in the manufacturing engineering industry, in both large and small organizations. Their activities could range from basic tool design, to numerical control programming, or to maintenance of production equipment. Graduates' learning would be significantly enhanced by opportunities to gain and reflect on as much practical experience as is feasible during their time in the program. While certain positions may require discrete knowledge or a higher level of a particular skill, it is clear that a cluster of common skills, knowledge, and attitudes essential to all entry-level employees in the manufacturing engineering field has been identified. Individual programs may choose to build on this standard by offering some degree of specialization.

There are opportunities for graduates to pursue further educational or occupational qualifications; through articulation agreements between the colleges, universities, professional organizations, or the apprenticeship board, graduates may be granted credits towards a degree, certification, or a trade apprenticeship. Students should contact individual colleges for further details of a college's articulation agreements with other institutions or professional associations.

Table of Contents


Synopsis of the Vocational Learning Outcomes

Please see the Glossary of Terms for definitions of words marked with an asterisk (*) in the sections below.

The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

  1. analyze and solve routine technical problems* related to manufacturing environments through the application of engineering principles.*
  2. conduct routine analysis* of components, processes, and systems through the application of engineering principles* and practices.*
  3. interpret and prepare graphics* and other technical documents* to appropriate engineering standards.
  4. use computer hardware and software to support the engineering environment.
  5. apply knowledge of manufacturing materials, operations, and processes to support the production of components.
  6. apply knowledge of machinery, tools and other equipment to manufacture and assemble components.
  7. conduct quality control and quality assurance procedures as required.
  8. recognize the environmental, economic, legal, safety, and ethical implications of manufacturing projects.
  9. use and maintain documentation, inventory, and records systems.
  10. contribute to the implementation of a manufacturing project.
  11. develop strategies and plans to improve job performance and work relationships.

Note: The learning outcomes have been numbered as a point of reference; numbering does not imply prioritization, sequencing, nor weighting of significance.

* See glossary

Table of Contents


The Vocational Learning Outcomes

Please see the Glossary of Terms for definitions of words marked with an asterisk (*) in the sections below.

1. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

analyze and solve routine technical problems* related to manufacturing environments through the application of engineering principles.*

Elements of the Performance

  • Calculate and convert correctly in Imperial and SI measurement units using both manual methods and electronic technology
  • Use engineering terminology correctly and accurately in written and oral communication
  • Identify the technical criteria necessary to construct components, processes, and systems
  • Apply engineering principles to the analysis and implementation of manufacturing projects
  • Carry out standard procedures involving the implementation, monitoring, and reporting of manufacturing processes

* See glossary

2. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

conduct routine analysis* of components, processes, and systems through the application of engineering principle s* and practices.*

Elements of the Performance

  • Review the tolerances and materials specifications applicable to manufacturing processes
  • Apply knowledge of conventional and electronic technologies to carry out routine analysis of components, manufacturing processes, and systems including automated methods
  • Identify properties of materials and assess their responses in an engineering environment
  • Apply basic* principles of method analysis and work measurement, mechanics, pneumatics, fluid mechanics, and hydraulics to analyze and solve problems
  • Apply basic* principles of control systems
  • Apply basic* knowledge of electricity and electronics
  • Identify ergonomic considerations

* See glossary

3. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

interpret and prepare graphics* and other technical documents* to appropriate engineering standards.

Elements of the Performance

  • Collect relevant information, data, and materials
  • Organize and prepare documents in accordance with recognized standards (e.g., company standards, CSA, ISO, etc.)
  • Employ conventional and computer-based drafting techniques to produce graphics for manufacturing projects
  • Employ freehand sketching techniques to produce graphics
  • Interpret and prepare technical drawings and documents, including reports, used in the design of components, processes, and systems

* See glossary

4. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

use computer hardware and software to support the engineering environment.

Elements of the Performance

  • Use computer systems and application software to resolve technical problems
  • Apply file management techniques to access and store data
  • Access and exchange information using electronic technology
  • Use computer hardware and applications to access and organize information and produce technical documents within an engineering environment
  • Use computer applications to support design and analysis within an engineering environment

5. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

apply knowledge of manufacturing materials, operations, and processes to support the production of components.

Elements of the Performance

  • Understand operations used in the production of components
  • Use systematic approaches to identify and resolve technical problems in the manufacture of components
  • Understand processes used to manufacture components
  • Assist in sourcing material, tools, equipment, supplies, and services related to production of components
  • Apply knowledge of computer-aided manufacturing techniques to support the production of components

6. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

apply knowledge of machinery, tools, and other equipment to manufacture and assemble components.

Elements of the Performance

  • Assess the performance characteristics, limitations, potential, and safety aspects of machinery, tools, and other equipment
  • Use machinery, tools, and other equipment to manufacture simple* components to required specifications
  • Program computer-aided machinery to manufacture simple* components to required specifications
  • Apply fabrication, joining, finishing, and assembly processes to support the manufacture of products from their components
  • Complete work in accordance with health and safety standards and legislation

7. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

conduct quality control and quality assurance procedures as required.

Elements of the Performance

  • Review the specifications applicable to a manufacturing project
  • Observe, record, and report compliance with appropriate quality assurance procedures and specifications
  • Perform or arrange to have quality-assurance sampling and testing done
  • Implement the collection and reporting of statistical data
  • Interpret and use the results of quality-assurance sampling and testing to make adjustments or changes to manufacturing processes
  • Select and use appropriate measuring instruments to inspect components as required

8. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

recognize the environmental, economic, legal, safety, and ethical implications of manufacturing projects.

Elements of the Performance

  • Consider the interrelationships among technology, society, the environment, politics, the economy, and manufacturing projects
  • Support the provision of a healthy and safe workplace environment
  • Apply ethical principles to own work
  • Meet legal responsibilities to adhere to relevant legislation in the workplace
  • Understand employer-employee contractual obligations within collective agreements
  • Promote equity and cooperation within the diversity of work groups

9. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

use and maintain documentation, inventory, and records systems.

Elements of the Performance

  • Use and maintain a paper-based and electronic system to store and retrieve information and to plan activities
  • Maintain current, clear, and accurate project-related documents in accordance with appropriate organizational practices
  • Use project-related records and inventories to prepare reports

10. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

contribute to the implementation of a manufacturing project.

Elements of the Performance

  • Identify the stages of a manufacturing project and their component activities
  • Assist in scheduling, coordinating, and monitoring a manufacturing project
  • Participate in long- and short-term planning
  • Assist in preparing elements of estimates

11. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

develop strategies and plans to improve job performance and work relationships.

Elements of the Performance

  • Solicit constructive feedback to one's own performance, strengths, and limitations
  • Identify opportunities for ongoing professional development ( e.g., professional associations, continuing education courses, and trade shows)
  • Assume responsibility and accountability for own competence
  • Keep abreast of technological changes

Glossary of Terms

Basic
of a fundamental nature, requiring a rudimentary knowledge of principles and practical skills

Documents
all project-related paperwork such as graphics, reports, estimates, specifications, and contracts

Engineering principles
the knowledge, skills, and attitudes used in engineering that are based on applied theory and research

Graphics
a pictorial representation of information such as designs, sketches, charts, schematics, and engineering drawings

Practices
the knowledge, skills, and attitudes used in engineering that are based on professional and industry associations' practice standards and ethical guidelines

Routine analysis
detailed examination which may be required on a regular basis and involve the application of basic principles of engineering theory and research

Routine technical problems
difficulties affecting the project which may be encountered on a regular basis and resolved through the application of basic principles of engineering theory and research, such as mechanics, pneumatics, fluid mechanics, and hydraulics

Simple
easily understood, done, or solved; consisting of only one part

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III. Generic Skills Standard

All graduates of Manufacturing Engineering Technician Programs must have achieved the thirteen generic skills learning outcomes listed on the following pages, in addition to achieving the vocational learning outcomes and meeting the general education requirement.

The generic skills learning outcomes listed in this program standard form part of the program standard for each two- and three-year college program. Additional information about these generic skills learning outcomes is contained in the Generic Skills Learning Outcomes for Two and Three Year College Programs in Ontario's Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology. CSAC: 1995.


Synopsis of the Generic Skills Learning Outcomes

The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

  1. communicate clearly, concisely, and correctly in the written, spoken, and visual form that fulfills the purpose and meets the needs of audiences.
  2. reframe information, ideas, and concepts using the narrative, visual, numerical, and symbolic representations which demonstrate understanding.
  3. apply a wide variety of mathematical techniques with the degree of accuracy required to solve problems and make decisions.
  4. use a variety of computer hardware and software and other technological tools appropriate and necessary to the performance of tasks.
  5. interact with others in groups or teams in ways that contribute to effective working relationships and the achievement of goals.
  6. evaluate her or his own thinking throughout the steps and processes used in problem solving and decision making.
  7. collect, analyze, and organize relevant and necessary information from a variety of sources.
  8. evaluate the validity of arguments based on qualitative and quantitative information in order to accept or challenge the findings of others.
  9. create innovative strategies and/or products that meet identified needs.
  10. manage the use of time and other resources to attain personal and/or project-related goals.
  11. take responsibility for her or his own actions and decisions.
  12. adapt to new situations and demands by applying and/or updating her or his knowledge and skills.
  13. represent her or his skills, knowledge, and experience realistically for personal and employment purposes.

Table of Contents


The Generic Skills Learning Outcomes

1. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

communicate clearly, concisely, and correctly in the written, spoken, and visual form that fulfills the purpose and meets the needs of audiences.

Explanation

Communicating in a clear, concise, and correct manner requires producing the written, spoken or visual material that best suits the situation. Graduates will have developed their ability to analyze their audiences to identify what is required and to match those needs with the means that is most appropriate. They will have produced material according to the style and conventions required, and they will have checked their products for accuracy and clarity. Finally, graduates will have used the tools available to them to create and correct their written, spoken, and visual messages.

Elements of the Performance

  • Plan and organize communications according to the purpose and audiences
  • Choose the format (e.g., memo, illustration, video, multimedia presentation, diagram) appropriate to the purpose
  • Incorporate the content that is meaningful and necessary
  • Produce material that conforms to the conventions of the chosen format
  • Use language and style suitable to the audience and purpose
  • Ensure that the material is free from mechanical errors
  • Use the computer technology that will enhance the production of materials
  • Evaluate communications and adjust for any errors in content, structure, style, and mechanics

2. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

reframe information, ideas, and concepts using the narrative, visual, numerical, and symbolic representations which demonstrate understanding.

Explanation

Responding to messages from many sources requires the ability to receive and to comprehend what has been received. One way to demonstrate that comprehension is to reframe, or restate in other forms, the original message. This requires graduates to have developed the skills to read, listen to, and observe messages contained within narrative and visual forms. It also requires the ability to construct unique narrative and visual representations that are consistent with the original messages.

Elements of the Performance

  • Develop and use strategies to read, listen, and observe effectively
  • Clarify what has been read, heard, and observed
  • Reproduce original information in other formats (e.g., written and spoken summaries; tables, figures, charts, diagrams, maps, drawings, photographs, and computer-generated graphics; terms represented by numbers; and values represented by letters or signs)
  • Use technology, where appropriate, to aid in reframing
  • Evaluate the representation for consistency of meaning with the original
  • Acknowledge the use of material from other sources according to the conventions of the medium used

3. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

apply a wide variety of mathematical techniques with the degree of accuracy required to solve problems and make decisions.

Explanation

Using mathematics effectively in everyday situations requires the ability to apply a wide variety of mathematical skills accurately. Graduates will have demonstrated their ability to apply the concepts of number and space to situations which include quantities, magnitudes, measurements, and ratios. They will have developed their ability to identify the need for mathematics, to apply mathematical techniques (concepts, conventions, strategies, and operations) and to check the results of their applications. This will require graduates to be flexible and creative and to be confident in their mathematical skills and abilities.

Elements of the Performance

  • Recognize situations that require mathematics
  • Assess potential mathematical strategies (including models, geometric representations or formulas, elementary algebraic equations, descriptive statistical methods, and mathematical reasoning) for suitability and effectiveness
  • Decide on the degree of accuracy required for answers
  • Estimate probable answers
  • Execute mathematical operations necessary to implement selected strategies
  • Use calculators or appropriate technological tools to perform mathematical operations accurately
  • Check for errors in numerical answers and the appropriate fit between problems and answers
  • Express answers clearly
  • Transfer the use of mathematical strategies from one situation to another

4. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

use a variety of computer hardware and software and other technological tools appropriate and necessary to the performance of tasks.

Explanation

Using computers and other technologies as tools to increase productivity and to enhance tasks requires graduates to have the confidence and ability to use the tools well. Graduates will have demonstrated the ability to recognize when computers and other technologies contribute to completing tasks, solving problems, performing research, and creating products. They will use the technological tool most appropriate to the task and use it accurately. Finally, they will have gained confidence in continuing to learn about and cope with new technologies in the future.

Elements of the Performance

  • Use basic operating system functions competently (e.g., load software, store, and retrieve data)
  • Determine which tasks can best be handled by computers and other technology
  • Select suitable software, equipment, and tools for the task
  • Use the software, equipment, and tools effectively, correctly, and ethically
  • Deal with equipment and software problems and errors in a logical and systematic manner
  • Transfer concepts, knowledge, and skills from one technology to another
  • Evaluate one's own use of hardware, software, and technological tools

5. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

interact with others in groups or teams in ways that contribute to effective working relationships and the achievement of goals.

Explanation

Working in teams or groups in either a work or personal context requires the ability to assume responsibility for collective duties and decisions. It also requires interacting effectively with the members of the group. Therefore, in achieving this outcome, graduates will have demonstrated their ability to understand and complete the various tasks required of them as group members. They will also have demonstrated their ability to understand and respond to others.

Elements of the Performance

  • Identify the tasks to be completed
  • Establish strategies to accomplish the tasks
  • Identify roles for members of the team/group
  • Clarify one's own roles and fulfill them in a timely fashion
  • Treat other members of the group equitably and fairly
  • Contribute one's own ideas, opinions, and information while demonstrating respect for those of others
  • Employ techniques intended to bring about the resolution of any conflicts
  • Regularly assess the group's progress and interactions and make adjustments when necessary

6. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

evaluate her or his own thinking throughout the steps and processes used in problem solving and decision making.

Explanation

Solving a range of complex problems and dealing with a variety of tasks require the thinking skills and strategies that will allow graduates to identify what has to be done and to select and implement the most suitable approach. In applying thinking skills and strategies, graduates will have understood the limits as well as the potential of their own thought processes. As well, in attempting various strategies, they will have explored styles of thinking that may be new to them. This will allow graduates to understand the way they think and how they approach decisions and problems.

Elements of the Performance

  • Clarify the nature and extent of problems or required directions
  • Explore various thinking skills and strategies that could be used
  • Identify limits as well as the potential of one's own thought processes
  • Choose and apply thinking skills and strategies (e.g., inductive and deductive thinking; creative and intuitive thinking; inquiry; critical thinking; and reflection)
  • Evaluate results of the thinking skills and strategies used in problem solving and decision making
  • Appreciate the benefits of the use of alternative types of thinking

7. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

collect, analyze, and organize relevant and necessary information from a variety of sources.

Explanation

Making decisions and completing tasks often requires information that can be used as support. Graduates, therefore, must be able to access current, relevant, and useful information and to organize that information in understandable ways. In achieving this outcome, graduates will have developed and used strategies to locate and gather a wide range of information, most particularly through technological means. They will have learned how to select pertinent information and to sort it so that it can be displayed in useful formats like databases and spreadsheets. This information can then be used to support decisions and to assist in the completion of tasks.

Elements of the Performance

  • Identify the nature of the information required
  • Investigate sources of information (including people, text, databases, and the Internet)
  • Gather information from the most appropriate sources using various data collection techniques, including technology
  • Examine the information and select what is relevant, important, and useful
  • Employ a variety of techniques to organize the information (e.g., spreadsheets, databases, graphs, and charts)
  • Draw conclusions about how the information can be used
  • Evaluate the processes used
  • Cite sources according to the conventions of the medium used

8. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

evaluate the validity of arguments based on qualitative and quantitative information in order to accept or challenge the findings of others.

Explanation

With the wealth of numerical and non-numerical information available, graduates must be able to interpret, understand, and draw conclusions about what others have produced. Graduates will have used their mathematical abilities to question the validity of statistics and other numerical claims. Graduates also will have used their language and critical thinking skills to analyze the assumptions and evidence that others use to support more qualitative arguments and conclusions. As a result, graduates will have developed the ability to question and make decisions about what they read, hear, and observe.

Elements of the Performance

  • Identify conclusions and claims made by others
  • Detect any fallacies, biases, misrepresentations, and assumptions and judge their relevance to supporting arguments
  • Check for accuracy and credibility of claims or arguments
  • Be prepared to defend acceptance or rejection of claims or arguments

9. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

create innovative strategies and/or products that meet identified needs.

Explanation

Creating strategies and products that are original and innovative will require graduates to develop their creative thinking skills to find alternative ways to address situations. Graduates will have developed the confidence to use old information in new ways; to see unique relationships; and to practice the lateral, divergent, and intuitive thinking that will yield new approaches.

Elements of the Performance

  • Analyze needs
  • Generate creative ideas for strategies and products that will meet needs
  • Choose alternatives to pursue based on needs and criteria of projects/plans
  • Create strategies/products
  • Evaluate strategies/products according to meeting needs

10. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

manage the use of time and other resources to attain personal and/or project-related goals.

Explanation

Achieving task-related goals in their personal and professional lives requires graduates to use their time, money, space, and other, often limited, resources as efficiently as possible. Graduates will have developed their ability to plan and predict ways of achieving goals. They will have developed and used tools intended to assist in the process. Finally, they will have attempted to follow their plans and use the tools, assessing regularly how realistic the goals, plans, and processes are and adapting when it is necessary.

Elements of the Performance

  • Define reasonable and realistic goals
  • Use planning tools (e.g., budgets and schedules) to achieve goals
  • Monitor the process and goals and respond to changes
  • Use resources (e.g., money, space, and time) efficiently to accomplish tasks
  • Reevaluate goals and the use of resources and make appropriate adjustments

11. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

take responsibility for her or his own actions and decisions.

Explanation

Making decisions, taking positions, and completing tasks require graduates to be accountable for actions taken and to defend their convictions. Graduates will have demonstrated their ability to evaluate what they do and why they do it. They will have taken into consideration their individual values, beliefs, and opinions and the effects these have on their actions. Not only will graduates be able to justify their decisions, they will be able to advocate positively on behalf of themselves.

Elements of the Performance

  • Review the results of one's actions and decisions
  • Reflect on the processes and practices used
  • Identify any errors and make corrections
  • Identify successes for adaptation to other situations
  • Account for how one's own values and beliefs affect actions and decisions
  • Evaluate and act upon constructive feedback
  • Be prepared to defend decisions made and actions taken
  • 12. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

    adapt to new situations and demands by applying and/or updating her or his knowledge and skills.

    Explanation

    Transferring skills from one context to another enables graduates to be lifelong learners. Graduates will have developed the confidence to know that their current skills are applicable to a range of changing, novel, and unexpected situations. They will have demonstrated their ability to reflect on what they can do, match those skills to the new demands, and apply previous skills or develop the additional ones that will make them as effective in the new situations.

    Elements of the Performance

    • Assess current skills, knowledge, and learning styles
    • Identify skills and knowledge required for new situations
    • Adapt current skills and knowledge to new situations
    • Identify new skills and knowledge required
    • Choose the most appropriate learning and working styles to acquire new skills and knowledge
    • Evaluate success of the processes and actual adaptations

    13. The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to

    represent her or his skills, knowledge, and experience realistically for personal and employment purposes.

    Explanation

    Preparing for changes in their personal and professional lives requires graduates to assess and present their accomplishments and abilities. In achieving this outcome, graduates will have developed their ability to reflect on what they have done and learned. They will also have summarized their abilities in ways that are attractive and useful to potential recipients. These ways may include portfolios and resumes. Finally, graduates will have developed the skills to present themselves and their accomplishments personally and with confidence.

    Elements of the Performance

    • Summarize one's own skills, knowledge, and experience realistically
    • Choose formats (e.g., resume, portfolio, and interview) which best display skills, knowledge, and experiences according to the situations
    • Evaluate responses to the representations and make any adjustments

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    IV. General Education Standard

    All graduates of Manufacturing Engineering Technician Programs must have met the general education requirement described on the following pages, in addition to achieving the vocational and generic skills learning outcomes.

    The General Education Requirement

    The Government of Ontario has established that each college postsecondary program shall include a minimum of one three-hour-per-week general education course of approximately 45 instructional hours per semester. Learners should experience a breadth of goals through their general education studies; and, wherever possible, they should have the opportunity to exercise choice in the selection of their general education courses.

    This general education requirement is an integral component of the Manufacturing Engineering Technician Program Standard, along with the vocational and generic skills learning outcomes.

    The general education requirement shall be met consistent with the following guiding principles:

    1. General education in the colleges shall identify and deal with issues of societal concern in a manner relevant to the lives of students. General education courses shall be structured in such a way as to guide students through the historical context of such issues, their theoretical bases, and application to contemporary life.

    2. All general education courses offered in the colleges shall be designed to provide benefits to one or more of the three areas: learners' personal growth and enrichment, informed citizenship, and working life.

    3. An essential component of the mission of Ontario's colleges is the encouragement and support of continuous learning. This commitment to lifelong learning shall be reflected in each of the general education courses offered in the colleges.

    General education appropriate for Ontario colleges is defined as those postsecondary learning experiences that enable learners to meet more effectively the societal challenges which they face in their community, family, and working life. General education in the colleges provides learners with insight into the enduring nature of the issues being addressed and into their particular relevance to today and the future. It is intended to encourage and support continuous learning. It is delivered as discrete courses which are designed to address one or more of the following goals and associated broad objectives established for general education:


    Goals and Broad Objectives

    1. Aesthetic Appreciation

    understand beauty, form, taste, and the role of the arts in society

    Broad Objectives

    • develop critical awareness of the arts in society
    • perceive and evaluate the role of the arts
    • heighten critical appreciation through development and application of personal and formal judgment factors

    2. Civic Life

    understand the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life

    Broad Objectives

    • develop knowledge of the structure and function of governments in Canada: legislative, judicial, and administrative arms; roles of elected officials and public servants; and a personal awareness of citizen responsibility
    • develop historical understanding of major issues affecting Canadian politics and a critical awareness of related public policy
    • develop awareness of international issues and their effects, and the place of Canada in international communities
    • develop awareness of the history, significance, and organization of the voluntary sector in community life

    3. Cultural Understanding

    understand the cultural, social, ethnic, and linguistic diversity of Canada and the world

    Broad Objectives

    • develop an understanding of cultural identity by linking personal history to broader cultural study
    • develop an understanding of the diversity of cultures and subcultures represented in Canadian society and of their interactions within the Canadian society
    • develop intercultural understanding through reasoned reflection on various cultures' responses to universal human issues

    4. Personal Development

    gain greater self-awareness, intellectual growth, well-being, and understanding of others

    Broad Objectives

    • consider one's expectations and values and analyze their impact on personal goals
    • apply an understanding of the individual and human development to personal life and relationships
    • integrate the concept of well-being into one's lifestyle
    • understand oneself as a learner and articulate one's own learning style

    5. Social Understanding

    understand relationships among individuals and society

    Broad Objectives

    • develop informed understanding of social organization and institutions and of ongoing issues in relationships between individuals, groups, and societies
    • develop informed understanding of social trends, social change, and social problems and of implications for social and personal response
    • develop informed understanding of contemporary social problems and issues

    6. Understanding Science

    appreciate the contribution of science to the development of civilization, human understanding, and potential

    Broad Objectives

    • develop an understanding of the history, philosophy, contributions, perspectives, and limitations of the sciences
    • develop an understanding of the scientific method and its uses in measuring quantifiable entities and confirming laws of nature

    7. Understanding Technology

    understand the interrelationship between the development and use of technology and society and the ecosystem

    Broad Objectives

    • relate implications of current transformations in technological knowledge and development to our physical and biological world
    • develop awareness of ethical positions on enduring issues regarding the place of the human species in the physical and biological world

    8. Work and the Economy

    understand the meaning, history, and organization of work; and working life challenges to the individual and society

    Broad Objectives

    • set personal expectations for efficiency, effectiveness, ethics, and rewards and reconcile them with the changing work environment
    • apply knowledge of the organization and structure of work, its institutions, and history; and of social and cultural attitudes to work
    • develop an understanding of the changing nature of work and the economy